‘Black Beauty’ revisited (1)

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell cover image

In preparation for drawing up the list of my Top 5 Horses in Children’s Books, I am reading Black Beauty. It was one of my best-loved books as a child yet I hadn’t picked it up since. I must have owned a copy as I read it a number of times but I have absolutely no memory of what the book looked like, whether it was hardback or paperback, of jumble-sale origin or brand-new.

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell cover image

This time round I’ve bought a secondhand copy as the covers of new ones I found in bookshops came nowhere near what my idea of Beauty ought to look like. (The ones I’ve included here are ones I do approve of!) As a classic book, long out of copyright, there are lots of editions available with variable cover images. Some make Beauty look handsome and noble (correct). Others are frankly naff, the artwork apparently based on a plastic toy animal rather than a living, breathing horse. One audio version cover makes Beauty more like a plump cartoon pig than well-bred horseflesh!

It is hard now to imagine a world as full of horses as ours is full of cars. They were ridden or driven as transport, pulled everything from smart carriages to ploughs, omnibuses to hearses, were used for pleasure riding, and as pets-cum-playthings and teaching aids for children. We understand that cars are owned and run by experts and enthusiasts, by those who just use them to get from A to B but take reasonable care of them, and by people who don’t know what goes on under the bonnet or how to drive sensibly or safely. And, before the advent of the internal combustion engine, it was just the same with horses. But horses are sentient beings and herd animals, not machines.

horse-drawn vehicles traffic jam

I now know that Black Beauty was written as a kind of 19th century best-practice guide to horse care rather than a pony story for children, which was how it was presented to me. Anna Sewell was concerned about the ill-treatment of horses, through ignorance, arrogance, and thoughtlessness as much as through deliberate cruelty or neglect. This is the only book she ever wrote and she frequently strikes a practical rather than a romantic note, trying to appeal to common sense, and even economy, if entreating compassion won’t wash. One of her lessons is that if you treat a horse well and don’t overwork it, you will get better service and more years out of it. She obviously understands the different conditions that must prevail in settings like livery stables – the hire-car outlet of its day – and cab ranks, grand country houses with designer stable blocks, and pleasant vicarage meadows. Some of the difference is down to sheer economic necessity, but not all. Some is due to the temperament of the owners and workers. Sewell seems to me a keen observer of human nature, even if her humans tend to embody types she wants to show us rather than 3-dimensional characters.

horse-drawn Victorian Hansom cab

Black Beauty is a short book and I am only a quarter of the way through – nothing too dreadful has happened to Beauty yet. But on this reading I can see that each chapter presents a small moral and/or practical lesson: how – and why – to break a horse in gently and slowly; how to get it used to traffic and trains; why bad habits like biting and kicking are a result of bad treatment; even how to find out the true character of an employee in a subtle way.

But as a child I just consumed Beauty’s narrative, even if on re-readings I knew that it was all going to go horribly wrong before it came right again. I think it’s where I first appreciated that there was a narrative arc to a story – for example, from riches to rags to riches again – or in Beauty’s case from bran mash to beatings and back. The book’s subtitle is The Autobiography of a Horse and it’s told in the first person (or first horse) by Beauty himself. I had forgotten this. I wonder if it was the first novel to be narrated by an animal? I’d also forgotten that Beauty (!) is male, and that poor put-upon, biter and kicker Ginger is female.

I know that Beauty, like a long-lost childhood sweetheart, has got to be top of my list. I just had to check him out first. More about Black Beauty later…

Black Beauty by Anna Sewell book cover design

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “‘Black Beauty’ revisited (1)

  1. As a non-horsey person I’m almost persuaded to read Black Beauty (albeit that this fine post isn’t a full review). But your riches-to-rags-and-back-to-riches comment had my mind wandering into related areas.

    Given that Black Beauty is male this is still virtually an animal counterpart to the Sleeping Beauty plot, and I wondered if Sewell was consciously indicating a parallel with the human Beauty’s fall from grace only to be finally restored. Yes, I know its a commonplace plot, especially in the fairytale genre, but it’s such a strong trope, utilised notably in Oliver Twist (another human, though male). It’s the ‘Beauty’ title that had me thinking.

    Tempting to look for closer parallels, but I think I’ll resist the temptation…

    • Interesting parallel. But Beauty’s riches/rags story is not the common one of sudden reversal – like, say, F Hodgson Burnett’s A Little Princess – but of gradual decline. He’s a commodity. His ‘riches’ are just the good luck of having a kind and knowledgeable owner in his first formative years. (Though I suppose it is only luck that Sleeping Beauty is born a princess.) That owner tries to ensure that he is passed on to a good place but Sewell shows the many factors that complicate this, at every step in the chain of buying and selling. Beauty has no control over his life and fortune and through the agency of humans becomes less beautiful, less healthy and strong, more damaged, so less valuable. The inevitable downward slope. Chance catches him before the final fall – though as I haven’t got there yet I can’t remember all the details! The parallel of slavery was what kept coming to mind as I read, particularly when he is old enough to be sold away from his mother. But more of this in another post…

  2. Pingback: Jumble Spoiler – 11/23/13 | Unclerave's Wordy Weblog

  3. Pingback: My Top 5 Horses in Children’s Books | Julia Lee Author

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s